PROJECT

Cisza Cafe System

Cisza means "silence" in Polish and this ordering system allows customers and baristas with differing levels of abilities, such as hearing/speech loss, to effectively order and communicate.

DESIGN RESEARCH,
VIDEO PROTOTYPING, UI/UX,
STORYTELLING
SPRING 2018, 4 WEEKS
TEAM: BRIDGET LEWIS,
CHRISTINE LEE
INTRODUCTION

We were challenged to analyze a task and imagine ways it could be improved for people with differing levels of abilities. Our team selected the cafe ordering process and focused on situations where the barista or customer could face language barriers or speaking/hearing impairments. We narrowed our scope to focus on ordering tea to-go, as steep times and other variables made this an interesting problem to tackle. Our system is centered around four components which utilize color and visual elements to decrease the language barriers, offer flexible ordering methods, and insure drink accuracy with limited to no verbal communication necessary.

MY ROLE

​​I collaborated with two other designers to develop research methods and insights that I used to ideate and sketch the idea for our system. I outlined the key functions and user interactions with our system and developed the narrative for our storyboard, then compiled all the clips into Premiere to generate the flow of the video. From these principles I created the interfaces for each system, and developed a visual identiy for Cisza that utilizes colorful visuals and patterns for quick and easy recognition.

OVERVIEW

Envisioning Tea

Video prototype of the connected system. Highlights how a deaf barista and customer wearing noise-cancelling headphones with loud music can still communicate and effectively complete the order together.

UNDERSTAND

Think Aloud Protocol

Used to understand the current process a barista goes through when taking an order. Including what questions they need to ask, how they remember customer ordrs, and how they communicate with the customer during the ordering process or when they need to get their attention.

Task Analysis

Used to break down information from the think aloud protocol, understand all actants involved, and evaluate each path the customer and barista could take when they are ordering/preparing the tea.

Bodystorming

We did not have access to participants with speaking/hearing impairments, so we used bodystorming to act out scenerios where the barista or customer could not hear or speak.

Insights

01. Ordering requires effective communication between customer/barista  

02. Language differences, hearing/speech loss, and loud cafes lead to communication challenges

03. Barista needs to accurately remember customers orders

04. Barista’s ability to question/notify customer about drink order is crucial for drink completion  

05. Customer needs to identify their drink when completed

06. Ordering a drink requires asking/answering many questions that are repetative for each customer

METHODS: 
BODYSTORMING,
THINK ALOUD PROTOCOL,
TASK ANALYSIS
No items found.

Ideation

We combined our ideas for a visual menu with limited text, sticker to serve as drink identifier/tea bag holder, ordering board for barista, and self-checkout systems to create four components that would offer a more comprehensive solution for both barista and customer.

Based on our insights we each generated 20-25 sketches individually and then posted them on the wall to reveiw together. In total we had around 60 ideas, and we listened to each person walk through their thoughts and then used voting dotes to indicate which ideas we wanted to move forward with.

Sketches my team and I generated during our open ideation session

Ideation

We combined our ideas for a visual menu with limited text, sticker to serve as drink identifier/tea bag holder, ordering board for barista, and self-checkout systems to create four components that would offer a more comprehensive solution for both barista and customer.

Based on our insights we each generated 20-25 sketches individually and then posted them on the wall to reveiw together. In total we had around 60 ideas, and we listened to each person walk through their thoughts and then used voting dotes to indicate which ideas we wanted to move forward with.

Adaptive Odering

​​Electronic menu can be used for self-checkout, and also rotated to be controlled by barista if customer cannot operate machine independently

Visual Menu

Electronic menu is straightforward to allow customers with minimal knowledge of the product to understand immediately, and visuals are universal to allow for a variety of language or speech barriers

Ensured Accuracy

Customer verifies their drink order during self-checkout, barista views a live feed of all drink orders and names, and card/sticker combination provides a written and graphic cue of drink order status and confirmation

Independent Ordering

Self-checkout model gives the customer control over their order, allowing them to ensure their order is accurate

Wireframes

These interfaces represent the higher level of information for both the barista and customer during the checkout process.

POINT OF VIEW

SYSTEM OVERVIEW

UNDERSTAND

Think Aloud Protocol

Used to understand the current process a barista goes through when taking an order. Including what questions they need to ask, how they remember customer ordrs, and how they communicate with the customer during the ordering process or when they need to get their attention.

Task Analysis

Used to break down information from the think aloud protocol, understand all actants involved, and evaluate each path the customer and barista could take when they are ordering/preparing the tea.

Bodystorming

We did not have access to participants with speaking/hearing impairments, so we used bodystorming to act out scenerios where the barista or customer could not hear or speak.

Insights

01. Ordering requires effective communication between customer/barista  

02. Language differences, hearing/speech loss, and loud cafes lead to communication challenges

03. Barista needs to accurately remember customers orders

04. Barista’s ability to question/notify customer about drink order is crucial for drink completion  

05. Customer needs to identify their drink when completed

06. Ordering a drink requires asking/answering many questions that are repetative for each customer

METHODS: 
BODYSTORMING,
THINK ALOUD PROTOCOL,
TASK ANALYSIS

Wireframes

These interfaces represent the higher level of information for both the barista and customer during the checkout process.

Ideation

We combined our ideas for a visual menu with limited text, sticker to serve as drink identifier/tea bag holder, ordering board for barista, and self-checkout systems to create four components that would offer a more comprehensive solution for both barista and customer.

Based on our insights we each generated 20-25 sketches individually and then posted them on the wall to reveiw together. In total we had around 60 ideas, and we listened to each person walk through their thoughts and then used voting dotes to indicate which ideas we wanted to move forward with.

Sketches my team and I generated during our open ideation session

Reflection

After the process was completed, I did some personal evaluations on how the execution could be improved in the future (in terms of research strategies, collaboration tactics, and design choices).

IMPROVEMENTS

It would have been incredibly useful to do initial user research with people who have hearing/speech impairments. Through the process of body storming we were able to act out these situations, but they do not show the knowledge and perspective we could have gained by understanding the actual needs of the people who would be using our system. Along with doing the initial research before ideation, it would have been useful to do user testing with these individuals after we created the prototype of our system (and throughout the journey of designing the interface). I selected the visuals for menus thinking that it would help people from other cultures where English wasn't their first language, but it would be valuable to see if these images align with different cultures interpretations of the items.

POINT OF VIEW

SYSTEM OVERVIEW

UNDERSTAND

Think Aloud Protocol

Used to understand the current process a barista goes through when taking an order. Including what questions they need to ask, how they remember customer ordrs, and how they communicate with the customer during the ordering process or when they need to get their attention.

Task Analysis

Used to break down information from the think aloud protocol, understand all actants involved, and evaluate each path the customer and barista could take when they are ordering/preparing the tea.

Bodystorming

We did not have access to participants with speaking/hearing impairments, so we used bodystorming to act out scenerios where the barista or customer could not hear or speak.

Insights

01. Ordering requires effective communication between customer/barista  

02. Language differences, hearing/speech loss, and loud cafes lead to communication challenges

03. Barista needs to accurately remember customers orders

04. Barista’s ability to question/notify customer about drink order is crucial for drink completion  

05. Customer needs to identify their drink when completed

06. Ordering a drink requires asking/answering many questions that are repetative for each customer

METHODS: 
BODYSTORMING,
THINK ALOUD PROTOCOL,
TASK ANALYSIS
No items found.

Ideation

We combined our ideas for a visual menu with limited text, sticker to serve as drink identifier/tea bag holder, ordering board for barista, and self-checkout systems to create four components that would offer a more comprehensive solution for both barista and customer.

Based on our insights we each generated 20-25 sketches individually and then posted them on the wall to reveiw together. In total we had around 60 ideas, and we listened to each person walk through their thoughts and then used voting dotes to indicate which ideas we wanted to move forward with.

How might we?

Design a system that allows both customer and barista with different communication challenges to order and make a cup of tea to-go at a cafe?

Customers and baristas need a new way to communicate because speech and hearing barriers can complicate the current system and lead to inefficiency and inaccurate orders.

Sketches my team and I generated during our open ideation session

Ideation

We combined our ideas for a visual menu with limited text, sticker to serve as drink identifier/tea bag holder, ordering board for barista, and self-checkout systems to create four components that would offer a more comprehensive solution for both barista and customer.

Based on our insights we each generated 20-25 sketches individually and then posted them on the wall to reveiw together. In total we had around 60 ideas, and we listened to each person walk through their thoughts and then used voting dotes to indicate which ideas we wanted to move forward with.

Adaptive Odering

​​Electronic menu can be used for self-checkout, and also rotated to be controlled by barista if customer cannot operate machine independently

Visual Menu

Electronic menu is straightforward to allow customers with minimal knowledge of the product to understand immediately, and visuals are universal to allow for a variety of language or speech barriers

Ensured Accuracy

Customer verifies their drink order during self-checkout, barista views a live feed of all drink orders and names, and card/sticker combination provides a written and graphic cue of drink order status and confirmation

Independent Ordering

Self-checkout model gives the customer control over their order, allowing them to ensure their order is accurate

Wireframes

These interfaces represent the higher level of information for both the barista and customer during the checkout process.

Sketches my team and I generated during our open ideation session

Wireframes

These interfaces represent the higher level of information for both the barista and customer during the checkout process.

POINT OF VIEW

SYSTEM OVERVIEW

UNDERSTAND

Think Aloud Protocol

Used to understand the current process a barista goes through when taking an order. Including what questions they need to ask, how they remember customer ordrs, and how they communicate with the customer during the ordering process or when they need to get their attention.

Task Analysis

Used to break down information from the think aloud protocol, understand all actants involved, and evaluate each path the customer and barista could take when they are ordering/preparing the tea.

Bodystorming

We did not have access to participants with speaking/hearing impairments, so we used bodystorming to act out scenerios where the barista or customer could not hear or speak.

Insights

01. Ordering requires effective communication between customer/barista  

02. Language differences, hearing/speech loss, and loud cafes lead to communication challenges

03. Barista needs to accurately remember customers orders

04. Barista’s ability to question/notify customer about drink order is crucial for drink completion  

05. Customer needs to identify their drink when completed

06. Ordering a drink requires asking/answering many questions that are repetative for each customer

METHODS: 
BODYSTORMING,
THINK ALOUD PROTOCOL,
TASK ANALYSIS
Sketches my team and I generated during our open ideation session

Ideation

We combined our ideas for a visual menu with limited text, sticker to serve as drink identifier/tea bag holder, ordering board for barista, and self-checkout systems to create four components that would offer a more comprehensive solution for both barista and customer.

Based on our insights we each generated 20-25 sketches individually and then posted them on the wall to reveiw together. In total we had around 60 ideas, and we listened to each person walk through their thoughts and then used voting dotes to indicate which ideas we wanted to move forward with.

Ideation

We combined our ideas for a visual menu with limited text, sticker to serve as drink identifier/tea bag holder, ordering board for barista, and self-checkout systems to create four components that would offer a more comprehensive solution for both barista and customer.

Based on our insights we each generated 20-25 sketches individually and then posted them on the wall to reveiw together. In total we had around 60 ideas, and we listened to each person walk through their thoughts and then used voting dotes to indicate which ideas we wanted to move forward with.

Adaptive Odering

​​Electronic menu can be used for self-checkout, and also rotated to be controlled by barista if customer cannot operate machine independently

Visual Menu

Electronic menu is straightforward to allow customers with minimal knowledge of the product to understand immediately, and visuals are universal to allow for a variety of language or speech barriers

Ensured Accuracy

Customer verifies their drink order during self-checkout, barista views a live feed of all drink orders and names, and card/sticker combination provides a written and graphic cue of drink order status and confirmation

Independent Ordering

Self-checkout model gives the customer control over their order, allowing them to ensure their order is accurate

Wireframes

These interfaces represent the higher level of information for both the barista and customer during the checkout process.

Reflection

After the process was completed, I did some personal evaluations on how the execution could be improved in the future (in terms of research strategies, collaboration tactics, and design choices).

IMPROVEMENTS

It would have been incredibly useful to do initial user research with people who have hearing/speech impairments. Through the process of body storming we were able to act out these situations, but they do not show the knowledge and perspective we could have gained by understanding the actual needs of the people who would be using our system. Along with doing the initial research before ideation, it would have been useful to do user testing with these individuals after we created the prototype of our system (and throughout the journey of designing the interface). I selected the visuals for menus thinking that it would help people from other cultures where English wasn't their first language, but it would be valuable to see if these images align with different cultures interpretations of the items.

UNDERSTAND

Think Aloud Protocol

Used to understand the current process a barista goes through when taking an order. Including what questions they need to ask, how they remember customer ordrs, and how they communicate with the customer during the ordering process or when they need to get their attention.

Task Analysis

Used to break down information from the think aloud protocol, understand all actants involved, and evaluate each path the customer and barista could take when they are ordering/preparing the tea.

Bodystorming

We did not have access to participants with speaking/hearing impairments, so we used bodystorming to act out scenerios where the barista or customer could not hear or speak.

Insights

01. Ordering requires effective communication between customer/barista  

02. Language differences, hearing/speech loss, and loud cafes lead to communication challenges

03. Barista needs to accurately remember customers orders

04. Barista’s ability to question/notify customer about drink order is crucial for drink completion  

05. Customer needs to identify their drink when completed

06. Ordering a drink requires asking/answering many questions that are repetative for each customer

METHODS: 
BODYSTORMING,
THINK ALOUD PROTOCOL,
TASK ANALYSIS

How might we?

Design a system that allows both customer and barista with different communication challenges to order and make a cup of tea to-go at a cafe?

Customers and baristas need a new way to communicate because speech and hearing barriers can complicate the current system and lead to inefficiency and inaccurate orders.

Sketches my team and I generated during our open ideation session

Adaptive Odering

​​Electronic menu can be used for self-checkout, and also rotated to be controlled by barista if customer cannot operate machine independently

Visual Menu

Electronic menu is straightforward to allow customers with minimal knowledge of the product to understand immediately, and visuals are universal to allow for a variety of language or speech barriers

Ensured Accuracy

Customer verifies their drink order during self-checkout, barista views a live feed of all drink orders and names, and card/sticker combination provides a written and graphic cue of drink order status and confirmation

Independent Ordering

Self-checkout model gives the customer control over their order, allowing them to ensure their order is accurate

Ideation

We combined our ideas for a visual menu with limited text, sticker to serve as drink identifier/tea bag holder, ordering board for barista, and self-checkout systems to create four components that would offer a more comprehensive solution for both barista and customer.

Based on our insights we each generated 20-25 sketches individually and then posted them on the wall to reveiw together. In total we had around 60 ideas, and we listened to each person walk through their thoughts and then used voting dotes to indicate which ideas we wanted to move forward with.

Wireframes

These interfaces represent the higher level of information for both the barista and customer during the checkout process.

POINT OF VIEW

SYSTEM OVERVIEW

UNDERSTAND

Think Aloud Protocol

Used to understand the current process a barista goes through when taking an order. Including what questions they need to ask, how they remember customer ordrs, and how they communicate with the customer during the ordering process or when they need to get their attention.

Task Analysis

Used to break down information from the think aloud protocol, understand all actants involved, and evaluate each path the customer and barista could take when they are ordering/preparing the tea.

Bodystorming

We did not have access to participants with speaking/hearing impairments, so we used bodystorming to act out scenerios where the barista or customer could not hear or speak.

Insights

01. Ordering requires effective communication between customer/barista  

02. Language differences, hearing/speech loss, and loud cafes lead to communication challenges

03. Barista needs to accurately remember customers orders

04. Barista’s ability to question/notify customer about drink order is crucial for drink completion  

05. Customer needs to identify their drink when completed

06. Ordering a drink requires asking/answering many questions that are repetative for each customer

METHODS: 
BODYSTORMING,
THINK ALOUD PROTOCOL,
TASK ANALYSIS
POINT OF VIEW

How might we?

Design a system that allows both customer and barista with different communication challenges to order and make a cup of tea to-go at a cafe?

Customers and baristas need a new way to communicate because speech and hearing barriers can complicate the current system and lead to inefficiency and inaccurate orders.

Ideation

We combined our ideas for a visual menu with limited text, sticker to serve as drink identifier/tea bag holder, ordering board for barista, and self-checkout systems to create four components that would offer a more comprehensive solution for both barista and customer.

Based on our insights we each generated 20-25 sketches individually and then posted them on the wall to reveiw together. In total we had around 60 ideas, and we listened to each person walk through their thoughts and then used voting dotes to indicate which ideas we wanted to move forward with.

Sketches my team and I generated during our open ideation session
SYSTEM OVERVIEW

Adaptive Odering

​​Electronic menu can be used for self-checkout, and also rotated to be controlled by barista if customer cannot operate machine independently

Visual Menu

Electronic menu is straightforward to allow customers with minimal knowledge of the product to understand immediately, and visuals are universal to allow for a variety of language or speech barriers

Ensured Accuracy

Customer verifies their drink order during self-checkout, barista views a live feed of all drink orders and names, and card/sticker combination provides a written and graphic cue of drink order status and confirmation

Independent Ordering

Self-checkout model gives the customer control over their order, allowing them to ensure their order is accurate

Wireframes

These interfaces represent the higher level of information for both the barista and customer during the checkout process.

Reflection

After the process was completed, I did some personal evaluations on how the execution could be improved in the future (in terms of research strategies, collaboration tactics, and design choices).

IMPROVEMENTS

It would have been incredibly useful to do initial user research with people who have hearing/speech impairments. Through the process of body storming we were able to act out these situations, but they do not show the knowledge and perspective we could have gained by understanding the actual needs of the people who would be using our system. Along with doing the initial research before ideation, it would have been useful to do user testing with these individuals after we created the prototype of our system (and throughout the journey of designing the interface). I selected the visuals for menus thinking that it would help people from other cultures where English wasn't their first language, but it would be valuable to see if these images align with different cultures interpretations of the items.

Think Aloud Protocol

Used to understand the current process a barista goes through when taking an order. Including what questions they need to ask, how they remember customer ordrs, and how they communicate with the customer during the ordering process or when they need to get their attention.

Task Analysis

Used to break down information from the think aloud protocol, understand all actants involved, and evaluate each path the customer and barista could take when they are ordering/preparing the tea.

Bodystorming

We did not have access to participants with speaking/hearing impairments, so we used bodystorming to act out scenerios where the barista or customer could not hear or speak.

Insights

01. Ordering requires effective communication between customer/barista  

02. Language differences, hearing/speech loss, and loud cafes lead to communication challenges

03. Barista needs to accurately remember customers orders

04. Barista’s ability to question/notify customer about drink order is crucial for drink completion  

05. Customer needs to identify their drink when completed

06. Ordering a drink requires asking/answering many questions that are repetative for each customer

How might we?

Design a system that allows both customer and barista with different communication challenges to order and make a cup of tea to-go at a cafe?

Customers and baristas need a new way to communicate because speech and hearing barriers can complicate the current system and lead to inefficiency and inaccurate orders.

POINT OF VIEW
Sketches my team and I generated during our open ideation session

Ideation

We combined our ideas for a visual menu with limited text, sticker to serve as drink identifier/tea bag holder, ordering board for barista, and self-checkout systems to create four components that would offer a more comprehensive solution for both barista and customer.

Based on our insights we each generated 20-25 sketches individually and then posted them on the wall to reveiw together. In total we had around 60 ideas, and we listened to each person walk through their thoughts and then used voting dotes to indicate which ideas we wanted to move forward with.

Adaptive Odering

​​Electronic menu can be used for self-checkout, and also rotated to be controlled by barista if customer cannot operate machine independently

Visual Menu

Electronic menu is straightforward to allow customers with minimal knowledge of the product to understand immediately, and visuals are universal to allow for a variety of language or speech barriers

Ensured Accuracy

Customer verifies their drink order during self-checkout, barista views a live feed of all drink orders and names, and card/sticker combination provides a written and graphic cue of drink order status and confirmation

Independent Ordering

Self-checkout model gives the customer control over their order, allowing them to ensure their order is accurate

Wireframes

These interfaces represent the higher level of information for both the barista and customer during the checkout process.

Reflection

After the process was completed, I did some personal evaluations on how the execution could be improved in the future (in terms of research strategies, collaboration tactics, and design choices).

IMPROVEMENTS

It would have been incredibly useful to do initial user research with people who have hearing/speech impairments. Through the process of body storming we were able to act out these situations, but they do not show the knowledge and perspective we could have gained by understanding the actual needs of the people who would be using our system. Along with doing the initial research before ideation, it would have been useful to do user testing with these individuals after we created the prototype of our system (and throughout the journey of designing the interface). I selected the visuals for menus thinking that it would help people from other cultures where English wasn't their first language, but it would be valuable to see if these images align with different cultures interpretations of the items.